Sheila Williams interview – life as a science fiction magazine editor


From her childhood memories of listening to her father tell the stories of Edgar Rice Burroughs, to her position as editor of Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction magazine, Sheila Williams talks about a lifetime of reading and loving the genre. She talks about the evolution of Asimov’s magazine, and short genre fiction in general. She also describes her day-to-day life as a fiction magazine editor. The interview was originally included as part of episode #229 of Fast Forward: Contemporary Science Fiction. This interview was recorded at the Capclave Science Fiction convention in October, 2009.

Sheila grew up in a family of five in western Massachusetts. Her mother had a master’s degree in microbiology. Ms. Williams’ interest in science fiction came from her father who read Edgar Rice Burroughs books to her as a child. Later Ms. Williams received a bachelor’s degree from Elmira College in Elmira, New York, although she studied at the London School of Economics during her junior year. She received her Master’s from Washington University in St. Louis. She is married to David Bruce and has two daughters

What are the Top 10 Most Important Dates in Movie and TV History?

Do you know what are the Top 10 Important Dates in Fiction?

Dates from Movies and TV that have significance to those stories and are exciting for fans to celebrate here in the real world the Top 10 Dates in Movie and TV History.

What date will take the top spot on our list? Will it be Judgement day from Terminator 2, the day HAL goes online in 2001: A Space Odyssey, or the day Doc Brown bumped his head and discovered the Flux Capacitor and Time Travel in Back to the Future?

Check out here the Top 10 Dates in Movie and TV History!

Watch to find out!

00:36 #10. July 4, 1996 from “Independence Day” (1996)
02:01 #9. October 16, 1997 from “Lost in Space” (1965-68)
03:23 #8. January 1, 2000 from “Futurama” (1999-2013)
04:45 #7. September 22, 2004 from “Lost” (2004-10)
05:55 #6. April 5, 2063 from “Star Trek: First Contact” (1996)
07:08 #5. December 21, 2012 from “2012” (2009)
08:24 #4. June 13, 1979 from “Friday the 13th” (1980)
09:44 #3, #2 #1 ????

 

What are the Dumbest Things In Star Trek Beyond Movie?

Star Trek Beyond is a fun, fast-paced space romp. But just like any great action movie these days, it still includes more than a few head-scratchers. Here’s a look at some dumb things in Star Trek Beyond everyone just ignored…

Watch them here!

Random chance | 0:13
Dangling plot thread | 0:46
Those darn drones | 1:28
Total re-Krall | 2:18
Beastie Bikes | 2:47
Uhura’s Spidey-sense | 3:36
Terrible security | 4:36
The Big Questions | 5:09
Scotty wrote the script | 5:36

 

What are Top 10 Stupidest Decisions in Sci-Fi Movies?

Top 10 Unbelievably Dumb Decisions in Sci-Fi Movies!

Science fiction can be intellectual and require a lot of thought and research, yet these characters made incredibly stupid decisions in the movies.Watch the video of the top 10 Stupidest Decisions in Science Fiction Movies. But what will take the top spot? Putting the Death Star exhaust port in such an accessible place, taking captured dinosaurs to America in the Jurassic Park sequel, or trusting robots with our military needs in the Terminator franchise? Watch to find out!

00:50 #10. Training Drillers to Become Astronauts from “Armageddon” (1998)
02:10 #9. Bringing the Sports Almanac Back in Time from “Back to the Future Part II” (1989)
03:29 #8. Falling in Love with a Humanoid Robot from “ex_machina” (2015)
04:41 #7. Testing the Drug ALZ113 from “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (2011)
05:40 #6. Running Straight Ahead from “Prometheus” (2012)
06:32 #5. Not Quarantining Kane from “Alien” (1979)
07:35 #4. Kissing the Infected from “28 Weeks Later” (2007)
09:01 #3, #2, #1 ????

Watch the video for more!

 

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (French: Valérian et la Cité des mille planètes) is a 2017 English-language French science fiction action film written and directed by Luc Besson and co-produced by Besson and Virginie Besson-Silla. The film is based on the French science fiction comics series Valérian and Laureline, written by Pierre Christin and illustrated by Jean-Claude Mézières. It stars Dane DeHaan as Valerian and Cara Delevingne as Laureline, with Clive Owen, Rihanna, Ethan Hawke, Herbie Hancock, Kris Wu and Rutger Hauer in supporting roles. Besson independently crowd-sourced and personally funded Valerian and, with a production budget of over $209 million, it is the most expensive independent film ever made.[10]

The film was released by STX Entertainment on 21 July 2017 in the United States and will be by EuropaCorp on 26 July in France.[11][12] Upon release, Valerian received mixed reviews from critics, who criticized the writing and plot but praised the and visuals.[13]

Top 10 Best Sci-Fi Horror Movies

“Top 10 Best Sci-Fi Horror Movies. This is a list of science fiction and horror genres coming together to make some of the greatest films ever made. WatchMojo presents the Top 10 Sci-Fi Horror movies! But what will take the top spot on our list? The Thing, The Fly, or Alien? Watch to find out!

00:41 #10. “28 Days Later” (2002)
01:36 #9. “10 Cloverfield Lane” (2016)
02:35 #8. “I Am Legend” (2007)
03:32 #7. “Frankenstein” (1931)
04:16 #6. “Sunshine” (2007)
05:06 #5. “Re-Animator” (1985)
06:03 #4. “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” (1956)
07:08 #3, #2, #1 ????”

ALIEN: COVENANT Insightful Commentary and Synopsis.

In a prologue, business magnate Peter Weyland speaks with his newly activated android, who chooses the name “David” after looking at a replica of Michelangelo’s statue of David. Weyland tells David that one day they will search for mankind’s creator together. David comments on his unlimited lifespan as compared to his creator’s limited one.

In 2104, 11 years after the Prometheus discovered alien life in the previous film, the colonization-ship Covenant is bound for a remote planet, Origae-6, with two-thousand colonists and over a thousand human embryos aboard. The ship is monitored by Walter, a newer android that physically resembles the earlier David model. A stellar neutrino burst damages the ship, killing some of the colonists. Walter orders the ship’s computer to wake the crew from stasis, but the ship’s captain, Jake Branson, dies when his stasis pod malfunctions, burning him while he’s still asleep. While repairing the ship, the crew picks up a radio transmission from a nearby, unknown planet, dubbed by navigator Ricks as “planet number four”.[9] Against the objections of Daniels (Branson’s widow), the new captain, Oram, decides to investigate.



As the Covenant remains in orbit, an expedition team descends to the earth-like planet’s surface and tracks the transmission’s signal to a crashed alien ship. While on the surface, security-team members Ledward and Hallett divert from the main group to perform field research. Ledward steps away and accidentally steps on alien spores and is soon infected. Meanwhile, Daniels and members of the main group notice cultivated common wheat, but also the complete lack of wildlife or animal sounds. Karine helps the rapidly-sickening Ledward back to the lander where Maggie quarantines them both inside the med-bay. A small, pale, alien creature (neomorph) bursts from Ledward’s back, killing him, and then mauls Karine to death. Maggie attempts to shoot the creature, but accidentally triggers an explosion which kills her and destroys the lander. The neomorph escapes to the planet’s surface while another such creature bursts from Hallett’s throat, killing him.

The neomorphs attack the remaining crew members and kill Ankor. The crew manage to kill one before David, who survived the Prometheus mission, scares away the other and leads the crew to a city full of humanoid (Engineer) corpses. David tells them that upon his and Dr. Elizabeth Shaw’s arrival at the planet, their ship accidentally released a black liquid bio-weapon which killed the native population and that Shaw died when the ship crashed in the ensuing chaos.

After the crew members tell David of their mission, they attempt to radio the Covenant for help, but the surviving neomorph infiltrates the city and finds security-team member Rosenthal alone before decapitating her. David tries to communicate with the creature, but is horrified when Oram kills it. Under Oram’s gunpoint, David reveals that the aliens are a result of his experimenting with the black liquid as a catalyst to create a new species. He leads Oram to an incubation chamber and tricks him into being rendered unconscious by an alien parasite (facehugger). Some time later, another alien creature (xenomorph) erupts from Oram’s chest, killing him.

As the others search for Oram and Rosenthal, Walter, who has found Shaw’s dissected corpse, confronts David after realizing that David had deliberately depopulated the planet when he unleashed the black liquid upon the Engineers. David explains that he believes humans are a dying species and should not be allowed to colonize the galaxy. When Walter disagrees, David disables him and confronts Daniels, telling her he will do to her “exactly what he did” to Shaw. Walter reactivates himself and fights David, allowing Daniels to escape while Lope is attacked by a facehugger. Security member Cole saves Lope, but the now mature xenomorph attacks them and kills Cole. Tennessee arrives in another lander to extract Daniels, Lope, and the victorious Walter. They kill the xenomorph before docking with the Covenant. However, Lope had been implanted with another xenomorph embryo, which bursts from his chest and kills him before escaping into the ship, quickly maturing before killing crew members Ricks and his wife Upworth. Walter helps Tennessee and Daniels lure the creature into the Covenant’s terraforming bay and flush it into space.

The Covenant resumes its trip to Origae-6, and the surviving crew re-enters stasis. Walter helps put Daniels under and she realizes, too late, that he is actually David. A horrified Daniels is unable to escape her stasis pod as she falls asleep while David watches. Now in control of both the ship and its population, David regurgitates two facehugger embryos and places them in cold storage alongside the human embryos before exploring the cargo bay containing the colonists in stasis. He then poses as Walter to record a log explaining that all crew members except Daniels and Tennessee were killed by the neutrino blast at the beginning of the film and that the ship is still on course for Origae-6 before signing off.