Untold History of Covert Government WWI-IRAQ, DARPA´s Artificial Mammalian Brain, Bin-laden Bob Lassar & Fake Roswell Aliens – A great podcast with Annie Jacobesen and Joe Rogan

From the very little one can gather from a 3 hour conversation, Annie Jacobsen is an awesome Journalist with a crazy “professional” obsession with the dark and untold, while also an almost morbid fascination with truth. Obviously this is not uncommon and this is her books are so tempting.

Perhaps, before we go to the books, you might enjoy Joe Rogan Experience #1299 – Annie Jacobsen , Joe Rogan who has a superb podcast.


Annie Jacobesen BIO

ANNIE JACOBSEN is a former Los Angeles Times journalist, bestselling author, and 2016 Pulitzer Prize finalist in history. Her nonfiction books are AREA 51, OPERATION PAPERCLIP, THE PENTAGON’S BRAIN, and PHENOMENA. She also writes television.

Jacobsen went to Princeton University where she was taught writing by Joyce Carol Oates and Paul Auster, studied Greek, and served as Captain of the Princeton Women’s Varsity Ice Hockey Team. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband Kevin and their two sons.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Annie Jacobsen

Books

Michael Swanwick interview – a look at the life of Hope Mirrlees

Award winning author Michael Swanwick discusses Hope-in-the-Mist, his non-fiction book about the life of Hope Mirrlees. He talks about her aristocratic life, her influential 1926 fantasy novel, Lud-in-the-Mist, and her poem, Paris.
He also discusses his own recent fiction projects.
This interview was recorded in 2009 and originally shown as part of episode 225. of Fast Forward: Contemporary Science fiction.

Urban planning legend Jane Jacobs is the subject of a new documentary

Jane Jacobs OC OOnt (born Jane Butzner; May 4, 1916 – April 25, 2006) was an American-Canadian journalist, author, and activist best known for her influence on urban studies, sociology, and economics. Her influential book The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961) argued that urban renewal did not respect the needs of most city-dwellers. In the book she introduced sociological concepts such as “eyes on the street” and “social capital”.

Jacobs was well known for organizing grassroots efforts to protect existing neighborhoods from “slum clearance” – and particularly for her opposition to Robert Moses in his plans to overhaul her neighborhood, Greenwich Village.

 

She was instrumental in the eventual cancellation of the Lower Manhattan Expressway, which would have passed directly through SoHo and Little Italy. She was arrested in 1968 for inciting a crowd at a public hearing on that project. After moving to Toronto in 1968, she joined the opposition to the Spadina Expressway and the associated network of expressways in Toronto planned, and under construction.

As a mother and a writer who criticized experts in the male-dominated field of urban planning, Jacobs endured scorn from established figures. She did not have a college degree or any formal training in urban planning, and her lack of such credentials was seized upon as grounds for criticism by some. Learn more here:

Celebrating Great Super Stars from the 80s and amazing insights on them. (That should be reused now).

Vernon Wells,  Jenette Goldstein, Christopher Lambert, Sonny Landham, Rutger Hauer, Timothy Dalton, Michael Biehn, Peter Weller have something in common. They thrived in the 80s. 

Vernon Wells

Jenette Goldstein

Christopher Lambert

Sonny Landham

Rutger Hauer

Timothy Dalton

Michael Biehn

Peter Weller

Emilio Estevez BIO

Emilio Estevez (/ɛˈmɪli ɛˈstɛvəs/; born May 12, 1962) is an American actor, director, and writer. He is the brother of actor Charlie Sheen. Estevez started his career as an actor and is well known for being a member of the acting Brat Pack of the 1980s, starring in The Breakfast ClubSt. Elmo’s Fire, and acting in the 1983 hit movie The Outsiders. He is also known for Repo ManThe Mighty Ducks and its sequels, Stakeout and Another StakeoutMaximum OverdriveBobby (which he also wrote and directed), and his performances in Western films such as Young Guns and its sequel.

Estevez was born on Staten Island,[2] the oldest child of artist Janet Sheen and actor Martin Sheen (legally Ramón Estévez). His siblings are Ramon EstevezCharlie Sheen (born Carlos Estévez), and Renée Estevez. Estevez’s paternal grandparents were Irish and Galician immigrants. His father is a “devout Catholic” and his mother is a “strict Southern Baptist“.[3]

Estevez initially attended school in the New York City public school system but transferred to a private academy once his father’s career took off. He lived on Manhattan’s Upper West Side until his family moved west in 1968 when his father was cast in Catch-22. Growing up in Malibu, California, Estevez attended Santa Monica High School.

When Estevez was 11 years old, his father bought the family a portable movie camera.[4] Estevez also appeared in Meet Mr. Bomb, a short anti-nuclear power film produced at his high school.[5] Estevez was 14 when he accompanied his father to the Philippines, where Sheen was shooting Apocalypse Now.[4] Estevez had a role as an extra in Apocalypse Now, but his scenes were deleted.[6]

When they returned to Los Angeles, Estevez co-wrote and starred in a high school play about Vietnam veteranscalled Echoes of an Era and invited his parents to watch it. Sheen recalls being astonished by his son’s performance, and “began to realize: my God, he’s one of us.”[7] After graduating from Santa Monica High in 1980, he refused to go to college and instead went into acting.[4] Unlike his brother Charlie, Estevez and his other siblings did not adopt their father’s stage name. Emilio reportedly liked the assonance of the double ‘E’ initials,[8] and “didn’t want to ride into the business as ‘Martin Sheen’s son’.”[4] Upon his brother’s using his birth name Carlos Estevez for the film Machete Kills, Estevez mentioned that he was proud of his Spanish heritage and was glad that he never adopted a stage name, taking advice from his father who regretted adopting the name Martin Sheen as opposed to using his birth name, Ramón Estévez.[9]

His first role was in a drama produced by the Catholic Paulist order. Soon after, he made his stage debut with his father in Mister Roberts at Burt Reynolds‘ dinner theater in Jupiter, Florida (this was the only job his father ever placed him in). Later, father and son worked together in the 1982 ABC-TV film about juveniles in jail, In the Custody of Strangers, in which Estevez did the casting.[4]

Estevez received much attention during the 1980s for being a member of the Brat Pack and was credited as the leader of the group of young actors.[10] Estevez and Rob Lowe established the Brat Pack when cast as supporting “Greasers” in an early Brat Pack movie, The Outsiders based on the novel. Lowe was cast as C. Thomas Howell‘s older brother Sodapop and Estévez as Two-Bit Mathews. During production, he approached his character as a laid-back guy and thought up Two-Bit’s interest in Mickey Mouse, shown by his uniform of Mickey Mouse T-shirts and watching of cartoons.

Besides his roles in In the Custody of Strangers and The Outsiders, his credits include NBC-TV‘s thrillers Nightmares and Tex, the 1982 film version of another S.E. Hinton story. He bought the movie rights to a third Hinton book, That Was Then, This Is Now, and wrote the screenplay. His father predicted he would have to direct to feel the full extent of his talents, describing him as “an officer, not a soldier.”[4]

After The Outsiders, Estevez appeared as the punk-rocker turned car-repossessor Otto Maddox in the cult film Repo Man before co-starring in The Breakfast Club and St. Elmo’s Fire. Following the success of these back-to-back Brat Pack films, he starred in That Was Then, This Is Now (which he co-wrote), the horror film Maximum Overdrive (for which he was nominated for a Golden Raspberry Award), and the crime drama Wisdom (with fellow Brat Packer Demi Moore). Estevez was originally cast in Platoon to be private Chris Taylor but was forced to drop out after production was delayed for two years; the role eventually went to his younger brother Charlie Sheen.[11] He went on to lead roles in the comedy/action film Stakeout and the westerns Young Guns and Young Guns II.

In the early 1990s, Estevez directed, wrote, and starred with his brother Charlie in a comedy about garbagemenMen at Work. Estevez later stated, “People come up to me on the street and say, Men at Work is the funniest movie I ever saw in my life. But, you know, I do have to question how many movies these people have seen.”[6]

In 1992, he found the career longevity that escaped other Brat Packers by starring in The Mighty Ducks as Coach Gordon Bombay,[11] a lawyer and former pee wee star and minor hockey prodigy looking to forget the past, forced into coaching a pee wee hockey team as a form of community service. The film turned out to be one of Disney‘s most successful franchises. It was followed by two sequels.[11] The following year Estevez starred in three films: the dark thriller Judgment Night, the spoof comedy Loaded Weapon 1, and comedy/action film Another Stakeout, which was the sequel to his earlier film Stakeout.

Estevez has acted alongside his father several times. He starred in (and directed) the 1996 The War at Home in which he played a Vietnam War veteran dealing with posttraumatic stress disorder, while Sheen played his unsympathetic father.[7]

Estevez appeared in an uncredited role in the feature film Mission: Impossible. From 1998 to 1999, he appeared in three television films: the spaghetti Western Dollar for the Dead (1998), the comedy Late Last Night (1999), and Rated X (2000), which he directed. In 2000, Estevez starred in the Moxie! Award-winning thriller Sand as part of an ensemble cast that also included Denis LearyJon LovitzHarry Dean Stanton, and Julie Delpy.

In 2003, he made his voice acting debut when he helped create the English dubbed version of The 3 Wise Men with his father. Later, Estevez starred in The L.A. Riot Spectacular and voiced the English version of the film Arthur and the Invisibles. In 2008, he guest-starred on his brother’s sitcom Two and a Half Men as an old friend of Charlie Sheen’s character. (His father Martin Sheen had also guest starred in 2005.)[12]

In an interview a month after the 2010 Oscar tribute to John Hughes he explained his absence as publicity shyness: “I’ve never been a guy that went out there to get publicity on myself. I never saw the value in it.”[13]

In 2017, his appearance in films was found to generate the highest return on investment (ROI) on average of all Hollywood actors.[14]

Christina Ritchie Bio

Christina Ricci (/ˈri/; born February 12, 1980)[1] is an American actress and producer. She is known for playing unconventional characters with a dark edge.[2] Ricci is the recipient of several accolades, including a National Board of Review Award for Best Supporting Actress and a Satellite Award for Best Actress, as well as Golden GlobePrimetime EmmyScreen Actors Guild and Independent Spirit Award nominations.

Ricci made her film debut at the age of nine in Mermaids (1990), which was followed by a breakout role as Wednesday Addams in The Addams Family (1991) and its sequel. Subsequent appearances in Casper and Now and Then (both 1995) brought her fame as a “teen icon“.[3] At 17, she moved into adult-oriented roles with The Ice Storm (1997), which led to parts in films such as Buffalo ’66Pecker and The Opposite of Sex (all 1998). She garnered acclaim for her performances in Sleepy Hollow (1999) and Monster (2003). Her other credits include Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998), Prozac Nation (2001), Pumpkin (2002), Anything Else (2003), Black Snake Moan (2006), Speed Racer (2008), and The Smurfs 2 (2013). Despite being known predominantly for her work in independent productions, Ricci has appeared in numerous box office hits — to date, her films have grossed in excess of US$1.4 billion.[4]

On television, Ricci appeared as Liza Bump in the final season of Ally McBeal (2002), and received acclaim for her guest role on Grey’s Anatomy in 2006. She also starred as Maggie Ryan on the ABC series Pan Am (2011–12), and produced and starred in the series The Lizzie Borden Chronicles (2015) and Z: The Beginning of Everything(2017). As well as voicing characters in several animated films, Ricci provided voices for the video games The Legend of Spyro: Dawn of the Dragon and Speed Racer: The Videogame (both 2008). In 2010, she made her Broadway debut in Time Stands Still.

Ricci married James Heerdegen in October 2013 and gave birth to a son in August 2014.[5] She is the national spokesperson for the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN).[6]