Who was Pablo Emilio Escobar?

Pablo Emilio Escobar was a Colombian drug and narcoterrorist. His cartel supplied the United States with 80% of the cocaine. His business returned $ 21.9 billion annually in personal income. He was considered one of the wealthiest criminal in history. He received various names some of them were Don Pablo, El Patron (The boss), El Magico (The Magician), El Zar de la Cocaína (The Tsar of cocaine) and El Señor (The Lord).

 Pablo Escobar early years

He was born on December 1st of 1949 in Rionegro in the Antioquia Department in Colombia. He was the third child of 7 children between Abel de Jesús Dari Escobar, a farmer, and Hermilda Gaviria. Escobar´s criminal career is thought to have started since he was a teenager, although Sebastian Marroquin, Escobar´s son says his father’s criminal career began when he started selling faked diplomas from the Universidad Autonoma Latinoamericana de Medellin. Escobar studied in this university for a short period but left without a degree.

Escobar started getting involved in criminal activities with his companion Oscar Bennel Aguirre. They began selling fake lottery tickets, stealing cars and contraband cigarettes. He earned $ 100,000 by kidnapping a Medellin executive.

Cocaine operations

During the 1975 Escobar starting developing his cocaine operations. He smuggled routes and flew planes around Panama and Colombia. In 1976 Pablo Escobar and his crew were found with 39 pounds of white paste. The judges made a case against Pablo Escobar and after two months of legal wrangling two officers were killed and the case dropped. Roberto Escobar says in that time the drug cartels were not so famous so that turned into a challenge for Pablo who lead into it turning himself into its master.

The high demand for cocaine in the United States made Escobar and his people created new routes to smuggle it. They bought a lot of land on an island named Norman´s cay which is very close to Florida. In the island, they bought an airstrip, hotel, harbor,  houses, boats and they built a refrigerator to cocaine. This island became a place a key place for the Medellin cartel.

Escobar was soon known worldwide and he began distributing cocaine to Venezuela, Dominican Republic, Mexico, United States, Spain and some say he reached Asia. On the best days of the business, the Medellin cartel earned as much as $70 million a day. They smuggled over 15 tons of cocaine per day into the United States.

Escobar also worked in his social image and was the sponsor of many football and national teams. He gave money to the poor and built fields so they could play. This made some people protect him from the police and even work as lookouts when he was around.

Escobar´s death

Pablo Escobar died on December 2, 1993, after being persecuted for 16 months. He was found in Los Olivos a middle-class barrio in Medellin, the police bloc was using a special technology to track the radio transmission from his radiotelephone.  In the fire shooting Escobar and his bodyguard were killed, although who gave the final shot is uncertain.

Bibliography

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pablo_Escobar

*https://www.biography.com/people/pablo-escobar-9542497

 

The Greatest Showman

Hugh Jackman leaves the x-men outfit to put on a show and …what a show! perhaps, in the words of the greatest showman “The Greatest Show on Earth?” Hugh had to research the life of “P. T. Barnum” whom he confidently calls “The Father of Pop Culture” to participate in the film about one of most amazing stories of a short era that flashed by.

The Greatest Showman is a 2017 American biographical musical drama film directed by Michael Gracey, written by Jenny Bicks and Bill Condon and starring Hugh Jackman, Zac Efron, Michelle Williams, Rebecca Ferguson, and Zendaya. The film is inspired by the story of how P. T. Barnum started the Barnum & Bailey Circus and the lives of its attractions.-https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Greatest_Showman

Jackman also commented that it was fun working with Zendaya, and that his daughter is a huge fan! ITs kind of ironic to think that her daughter was more impressed with that than with her dad being Wolverine. 😉

Now for some real stories about the Buzz Making founder of the “Greatest Show on Earth”, a genius showman how came up with the showbiz magic that is still being used today.

Why is Herodotus called “The Father of History”?

Herodotus was a Greek historian who was born in Halicarnassus in the Persian Empire (modern-day Bodrum, Turkey) and lived in the fifth century BC (c. 484–c. 425 BC), a contemporary of Thucydides, Socrates, and Euripides. He is often referred to as “The Father of History”, a title first conferred by Cicero; he was the first historian known to have broken from Homeric tradition to treat historical subjects as a method of investigation—specifically, by collecting his materials systematically and critically, and then arranging them into a historiographic narrative.

“2,500 years ago, the writing of history as we know it didn’t exist. The past was recorded as a list of events, with little explanation for their causes beyond accepting things as the will of the gods. Herodotus wanted a deeper understanding, so he took a new approach: looking at events from both sides to understand the reasons for them. Mark Robinson explains how “history” came into being.”

The Histories is the only work which he is known to have produced, a record of his “inquiry” on the origins of the Greco-Persian Wars; it primarily deals with the lives of Croesus, Cyrus, Cambyses, Smerdis, Darius, and Xerxes and the battles of Marathon, Thermopylae, Artemisium, Salamis, Plataea, and Mycale; however, its many cultural, ethnographical, geographical, historiographical, and other digressions form a defining and essential part of the Histories and contain a wealth of information. Some of his stories are fanciful and others inaccurate; yet he states that he is reporting only what he was told; a sizable portion of the information he provided was later confirmed by historians and archaeologists. Despite Herodotus’s historical significance, little is known of his personal life. -https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herodotus

Why was Abraham Lincoln Murdered?

Abraham Lincoln was the 16 th of the United States starting from March 1981 until April 1865 when he was murdered. Lincoln took the United States through the Civil War, set the way to eliminate slavery in the USA.

He was born in Hodgenville in Kentucky, mostly self-educated he became a lawyer in Illinois. As the leader of the moderate faction of the Republican Party, Lincoln confronted Radical Republicans, who demanded harsher treatment of the South, War Democrats, who rallied a large faction of former opponents into his camp, anti-war Democrats (called Copperheads), who despised him, and irreconcilable secessionists, who plotted his assassination. Lincoln fought back by pitting his opponents against each other, by carefully planned political patronage, and by appealing to the American people with his powers of oratory. His Gettysburg Address became an iconic endorsement of nationalism, republicanism, equal rights, liberty, and democracy. Lincoln concentrated on the military and political dimensions of the war in order to reunite the nation. He suspended habeas corpus, leading to the controversial ex parte Merryman decision, and he averted potential British intervention by defusing the Trent Affair. Lincoln closely supervised the war effort, especially the selection of generals, including his most successful general, Ulysses S. Grant. He made major decisions on Union war strategy, including a naval blockade that shut down the South’s trade. As the war progressed, his complex moves toward ending slavery included the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863; Lincoln used the U.S. Army to protect escaped slaves, encouraged the border states to outlaw slavery, and pushed through Congress the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which permanently outlawed slavery.” taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Lincoln

Many theories have overcome on why Booth killed President Lincoln some of them say There are various theories about Booth’s motivations. In a letter to his mother, he wrote of his desire to avenge the South. Doris Kearns Goodwin has endorsed the idea that another factor was Wilkes’ rivalry with his well-known older brother, actor Edwin Booth, who was a loyal Unionist. David S. Reynolds believes Wilkes greatly admired the abolitionist John Brown; Wilkes’ sister Asia Booth Clarke quoted him as saying: “John Brown was a man inspired, the grandest character of the century!” On April 11, Booth attended Lincoln’s speech at the White House in which Lincoln promoted voting rights for blacks; Booth said “That means nigger citizenship … That is the last speech he will ever give.” He urged Lewis Powell to shoot Lincoln on the spot, and when Powell refused for fear of the crowd, said to David Herold, “By God, I’ll put him through.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assassination_of_Abraham_Lincoln

Booth´s words after he killed President Lincoln.

Who is Beverly Clearly?

” Beverly Atlee Cleary (née Bunn; born April 12, 1916) is an American writer of children’s and young adult fiction. One of America’s most successful living authors, 91 million copies of her books have been sold worldwide since her first book was published in 1950. Some of Cleary’s best-known characters are Henry Huggins and his dog Ribsy, Ramona Quimby and Beezus Quimby, and Ralph S. Mouse.

The majority of Cleary’s books were set in the Grant Park neighborhood of northeast Portland, Oregon, where she was raised, and she has been credited as one of the first authors of children’s literature to figure emotional realism in the narratives of her characters, often children in middle-class families.

She won the 1981 National Book Award for Ramona and Her Mother and the 1984 Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw. For her lifetime contributions to American literature, Cleary received the National Medal of Arts, recognition as a Library of Congress Living Legend, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal from the Association for Library Service to Children. The Beverly Cleary School, a public school in Portland, was named after her, and several statues of her most famous characters were erected in Grant Park, Portland, in 1995.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beverly_Cleary

Who is Louis Sachar?

” Louis Sachar (/ˈsækər/ SAK-ər; born March 20, 1954) is an American writer of children’s books. He is best known for the Wayside School series and HolesHoles won the 1998 U.S. National Book Award for Young People’s Literature and the 1999 Newbery Medal for the year’s “most distinguished contribution to American literature for children”. In 2012 it was ranked number six among all-time children’s novels in a survey published by School Library Journal.

After graduating high school, Sachar attended Antioch College for a semester before transferring to the University of California, Berkeley, during which time he began helping at an elementary school in return for college credit. Sachar later recalled,

Sachar graduated from UC Berkeley in 1976 with a degree in Economics and began working on Sideways Stories From Wayside School, a children’s book set at an elementary school with supernatural elements. Although the book’s students were named after children from Hillside and there is a presumably autobiographical character named “Louis the Yard Teacher,”  Sachar has said that he draws very little from personal experience, explaining that “….my personal experiences are kind of boring. I have to make up what I put in my books.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Sachar

Who was Dr. Seuss?

” Theodor Seuss Geisel (/ˈsɔɪs ˈɡzəl/ (About this sound listen); March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991) was an American author, political cartoonist, poet, animator, book publisher, and artist, best known for authoring children’s books under the pen name Dr. Seuss (/sjs/). His work includes several of the most popular children’s books of all time, selling over 600 million copies and being translated into more than 20 languages by the time of his death.

Geisel adopted his “Dr. Seuss” pen name during his university studies at Dartmouth College and the University of Oxford. He left Oxford in 1927 to begin his career as an illustrator and cartoonist for Vanity FairLife, and various other publications. He also worked as an illustrator for advertising campaigns, most notably for Flit and Standard Oil, and as a political cartoonist for the New York newspaper PM. He published his first children’s book And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street in 1937. During World War II, he worked in an animation department of the United States Army where he produced several short films, including Design for Death, which later won the 1947 Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.

After the war, Geisel focused on children’s books, writing classics such as If I Ran the Zoo (1950), Horton Hears a Who! (1955), If I Ran the Circus (1956), The Cat in the Hat (1957), How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1957), and Green Eggs and Ham (1960). He published over 60 books during his career, which have spawned numerous adaptations, including 11 television specials, four feature films, a Broadway musical, and four television series. He won the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1958 for Horton Hatches the Egg and again in 1961 for And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street. Geisel’s birthday, March 2, has been adopted as the annual date for National Read Across America Day, an initiative on reading created by the National Education Association.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Seuss

 

Who was Mother Teresa of Calcutta?

Mother Teresa of Calcutta was a magnificent human being, during her life and after her death, she was praised. Her incredible work on the poor and hungry. She founded schools and was against abortion.

” Mother Teresa, known in the Catholic Church as Saint Teresa of Calcutta (born Anjezë Gonxhe Bojaxhiu; Albanian: [aˈɲɛzə ˈɡɔndʒɛ bɔjaˈdʒiu]; 26 August 1910 – 5 September 1997), was an Albanian-Indian Roman Catholic nun and missionary. She was born in Skopje (now the capital of the Republic of Macedonia), then part of the Kosovo Vilayet of the Ottoman Empire. After living in Macedonia for eighteen years she moved to Ireland and then to India, where she lived for most of her life.

In 1950 Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity, a Roman Catholic religious congregation which had over 4,500 sisters and was active in 133 countries in 2012. The congregation manages homes for people dying of HIV/AIDS, leprosy and tuberculosis; soup kitchens; dispensaries and mobile clinics; children’s- and family-counseling programmes; orphanages, and schools. Members, who take vows of chastity, poverty, and obedience, also profess a fourth vow: to give “wholehearted free service to the poorest of the poor”.

Teresa received a number of honors, including the 1962 Ramon Magsaysay Peace Prize and 1979 Nobel Peace Prize. She was canonized (recognized by the church as a saint) on 4 September 2016, and the anniversary of her death (5 September) is her feast day.

A controversial figure during her life and after her death, Teresa was admired by many for her charitable work. She was praised and criticised for her opposition to abortion and criticised for poor conditions in her houses for the dying. Her authorized biography was written by Navin Chawla and published in 1992, and she has been the subject of films and other books. On September 6, 2017, Teresa was named co-patron of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Calcutta, alongside St. Francis Xavier.”

Who Was Jack the Ripper?

” Jack the Ripper is the best-known name for an unidentified serial killer generally believed to have been active in the largely impoverished areas in and around the Whitechapel district of London in 1888. The name “Jack the Ripper” originated in a letter written by someone claiming to be the murderer that was disseminated in the media. The letter is widely believed to have been a hoax and may have been written by journalists in an attempt to heighten interest in the story and increase their newspapers’ circulation. In both the criminal case files and contemporary journalistic accounts, the killer was called “the Whitechapel Murderer” and “Leather Apron”.

Attacks ascribed to Jack the Ripper typically involved female prostitutes who lived and worked in the slums of the East End of London whose throats were cut prior to abdominal mutilations. The removal of internal organs from at least three of the victims led to proposals that their killer had some anatomical or surgical knowledge. Rumours that the murders were connected intensified in September and October 1888, and letters were received by media outlets and Scotland Yard from a writer or writers purporting to be the murderer. The “From Hell” letter received by George Lusk of the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee came with half of a preserved human kidney, purportedly taken from one of the victims. The public came increasingly to believe in a single serial killer known as “Jack the Ripper”, mainly because of the extraordinarily brutal nature of the murders, and because of media treatment of the events.

Extensive newspaper coverage bestowed widespread and enduring international notoriety on the Ripper, and the legend solidified. A police investigation into a series of eleven brutal killings in Whitechapel up to 1891 was unable to connect all the killings conclusively to the murders of 1888. Five victims—Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, Catherine Eddowes, and Mary Jane Kelly—are known as the “canonical five” and their murders between 31 August and 9 November 1888 are often considered the most likely to be linked. The murders were never solved, and the legends surrounding them became a combination of genuine historical research, folklore, and pseudohistory. The term “Ripperology” was coined to describe the study and analysis of the Ripper cases. There are now over one hundred hypotheses about the Ripper’s identity, and the murders have inspired many works of fiction.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_the_Ripper

Who is Johnny Depp?

” John Christopher Depp II (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, producer, and musician. He has won the Golden Globe Award and Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actor. He rose to prominence on the 1980s television series 21 Jump Street, becoming a teen idol.

Depp has taken on the task of challenging himself to portray “larger-than-life” roles, starting with a supporting role in Oliver Stone’s Vietnam War film Platoon in 1986, then playing the title character in the romantic dark fantasy Edward Scissorhands (1990). He later found box office success in the fantasy adventure film Sleepy Hollow (1999), the fantasy swashbuckler film Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003) and its sequels, the fantasy film Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005), the fantasy film Alice in Wonderland (2010) and voicing the title character in the animated action comedy western Rango (2011). He has collaborated on nine films with the director, producer, and friend Tim Burton.

Depp is regarded as one of the world’s biggest film stars. He has gained praise from reviewers for his portrayals including screenwriter-director Ed Wood in Ed Wood, undercover FBI agent Joseph D. Pistone in Donnie Brasco, author J. M. Barrie in Finding Neverland, and the Boston gangster Whitey Bulger in Black Mass. Films featuring Depp have grossed over $3.2 billion at the United States box office and over $8 billion worldwide. His most commercially successful films are the Pirates of the Caribbean films, which have grossed $3 billion, Alice in Wonderland, which grossed $1 billion, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which grossed $474 million, and The Tourist, which grossed $278 million.

Depp has been nominated for major acting awards, including three nominations for Academy Award for Best Actor. Depp won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy for Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street and the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role for The Curse of the Black Pearl. He has been listed in the 2012 Guinness World Records as the highest paid actor, with earnings of $75 million. Depp was inducted as a Disney Legend in 2015.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Depp

Who was Amelia Earhart?

“Amelia Mary Earhart (/ˈɛərhɑːrt/, born July 24, 1897; disappeared July 2, 1937) was an American aviation pioneer and author. Earhart was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She received the U.S. Distinguished Flying Cross for this accomplishment. She set many other records, wrote best-selling books about her flying experiences and was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots. In 1935, Earhart became a visiting faculty member at Purdue University as an advisor to aeronautical engineering and a career counselor to women students. She was also a member of the National Woman’s Party and an early supporter of the Equal Rights Amendment.

During an attempt to make a circumnavigational flight of the globe in 1937 in a Purdue-funded Lockheed Model 10-E Electra, Earhart disappeared over the central Pacific Ocean near Howland Island. Fascination with her life, career, and disappearance continues to this day.

Who was Harriet Tubman?

” Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Ross; c. 1822 – March 10, 1913) was an American abolitionist, humanitarian, and an armed scout and spy for the United States Army during the American Civil War. Born into slavery, Tubman escaped and subsequently made some thirteen missions to rescue approximately seventy enslaved people, family, and friends, using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. She later helped abolitionist John Brown recruit men for his raid on Harpers Ferry, and in the post-war era was an active participant in the struggle for women’s suffrage.

Born a slave in Dorchester County, Maryland, Tubman was beaten and whipped by her various masters as a child. Early in life, she suffered a traumatic head wound when an irate slave owner threw a heavy metal weight intending to hit another slave and hit her instead. The injury caused dizziness, pain, and spells of hypersomnia, which occurred throughout her life. She was a devout Christian and experienced strange visions and vivid dreams, which she ascribed to premonitions from God.

In 1849, Tubman escaped to Philadelphia, then immediately returned to Maryland to rescue her family. Slowly, one group at a time, she brought relatives with her out of the state, and eventually guided dozens of other slaves to freedom. Traveling by night and in extreme secrecy, Tubman (or “Moses”, as she was called) “never lost a passenger”. After the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was passed, she helped guide fugitives farther north into British North America and helped newly freed slaves find work.

When the Civil War began, Tubman worked for the Union Army, first as a cook and nurse, and then as an armed scout and spy. The first woman to lead an armed expedition in the war, she guided the raid at Combahee Ferry, which liberated more than 700 slaves. After the war, she retired to the family home on property she had purchased in 1859 in Auburn, New York, where she cared for her aging parents. She was active in the women’s suffrage movement until illness overtook her and she had to be admitted to a home for elderly African Americans that she had helped to establish years earlier. After she died in 1913, she became an icon of American courage and freedom.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harriet_Tubman

Who was Martin Luther King?

“Martin Luther King Jr. (born Michael King Jr., January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the Civil Rights Movement. He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using the tactics of nonviolence and civil disobedience based on his Christian beliefs and inspired by the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi.

King became a civil rights activist early in his career. He led the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957, serving as its first president. With the SCLC, King led an unsuccessful 1962 struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia, and helped organize the 1963 nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Alabama. King also helped to organize the 1963 March on Washington, where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech.

On October 14, 1964, King received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolent resistance. In 1965, he helped to organize the Selma to Montgomery marches, and the following year he and SCLC took the movement north to Chicago to work on segregated housing. In the final years of his life, King expanded his focus to include opposition towards poverty and the Vietnam War, alienating many of his liberal allies with a 1967 speech titled “Beyond Vietnam”.

In 1968, King was planning a national occupation of Washington, D.C., to be called the Poor People’s Campaign, when he was assassinated by James Earl Ray on April 4 in Memphis, Tennessee. King’s death was followed by riots in many U.S. cities. Ray, who fled the country, was arrested two months later at London Heathrow Airport. Ray was sentenced to 99 years in prison for King’s murder and died in 1998 from hepatitis while serving his sentence.

King was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal. Martin Luther King Jr. Day was established as a holiday in numerous cities and states beginning in 1971, and as a U.S. federal holiday in 1986. Hundreds of streets in the U.S. have been renamed in his honor, and a county in Washington State was also renamed for him. The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was dedicated in 2011. ” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Luther_King_Jr.

 

Who is Charles Chaplin?

” Sir Charles Spencer “Charlie” Chaplin, KBE (16 April 1889 – 25 December 1977) was an English comic actor, filmmaker, and composer who rose to fame in the era of silent film. Chaplin became a worldwide icon through his screen persona “the Tramp” and is considered one of the most important figures in the history of the film industry. His career spanned more than 75 years, from childhood in the Victorian era until a year before his death in 1977, and encompassed both adulation and controversy.

Chaplin’s childhood in London was one of poverty and hardship. As his father was absent and his mother struggled financially, he was sent to a workhouse twice before the age of nine. When he was 14, his mother was committed to a mental asylum. Chaplin began performing at an early age, touring music halls and later working as a stage actor and comedian. At 19, he was signed to the prestigious Fred Karno company, which took him to America. Chaplin was scouted for the film industry and began appearing in 1914 for Keystone Studios. He soon developed the Tramp persona and formed a large fan base. Chaplin directed his own films from an early stage and continued to hone his craft as he moved to the Essanay, Mutual, and First National corporations. By 1918, he was one of the best-known figures in the world.

In 1919, Chaplin co-founded the distribution company United Artists, which gave him complete control over his films. His first feature-length was The Kid (1921), followed by A Woman of Paris (1923), The Gold Rush (1925), and The Circus (1928). He refused to move to sound films in the 1930s, instead of producing City Lights (1931) and Modern Times (1936) without dialogue. Chaplin became increasingly political, and his next film, The Great Dictator (1940), satirized Adolf Hitler. The 1940s were a decade marked by controversy for Chaplin, and his popularity declined rapidly. He was accused of communist sympathies, while his involvement in a paternity suit and marriages to much younger women caused scandal. An FBI investigation was opened, and Chaplin was forced to leave the United States and settle in Switzerland. He abandoned the Tramp in his later films, which include Monsieur Verdoux (1947), Limelight (1952), A King in New York (1957), and A Countess from Hong Kong (1967).” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlie_Chaplin

The Four Confidences by Ed Latimore

The four confidences in the process, the instruction, the past and in learning. It’s 24 pages short and to the point written by the charismatic heavyweight boxer Edward Latimore. Stepping into the ring knowing you can get hurt can overwhelm the toughest combative sports athletes. Ed shares his insights on how he built his confidence, leaving out the usual self-development fluff.

Taking action, learning along the (right) way, eliminating mistakes from happening again and actively seeking good sources ― that’s how confidence is built.

“The Four Confidences are based on cold, hard experience, not theory. The same way I got confidence in my boxing, mathematical, and social abilities are what I teach here. When I wasn’t confident in my self to stay sober, I relied on these techniques to help me stop drinking.” ― Ed Latimore.