Why is Herodotus called “The Father of History”?

Herodotus was a Greek historian who was born in Halicarnassus in the Persian Empire (modern-day Bodrum, Turkey) and lived in the fifth century BC (c. 484–c. 425 BC), a contemporary of Thucydides, Socrates, and Euripides. He is often referred to as “The Father of History”, a title first conferred by Cicero; he was the first historian known to have broken from Homeric tradition to treat historical subjects as a method of investigation—specifically, by collecting his materials systematically and critically, and then arranging them into a historiographic narrative.

“2,500 years ago, the writing of history as we know it didn’t exist. The past was recorded as a list of events, with little explanation for their causes beyond accepting things as the will of the gods. Herodotus wanted a deeper understanding, so he took a new approach: looking at events from both sides to understand the reasons for them. Mark Robinson explains how “history” came into being.”

The Histories is the only work which he is known to have produced, a record of his “inquiry” on the origins of the Greco-Persian Wars; it primarily deals with the lives of Croesus, Cyrus, Cambyses, Smerdis, Darius, and Xerxes and the battles of Marathon, Thermopylae, Artemisium, Salamis, Plataea, and Mycale; however, its many cultural, ethnographical, geographical, historiographical, and other digressions form a defining and essential part of the Histories and contain a wealth of information. Some of his stories are fanciful and others inaccurate; yet he states that he is reporting only what he was told; a sizable portion of the information he provided was later confirmed by historians and archaeologists. Despite Herodotus’s historical significance, little is known of his personal life. -https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herodotus

Who was Hippolyta?

” In Classical Greek mythology, Hippolyta (/hɪˈpɒlɪˌtə/; Greek: Ἱππολύτη Hippolyte) was the Amazonian queen who possessed a magical girdle that was given to her by her father, Ares, the god of war. The girdle was a waist belt that signified her authority as queen of the Amazons. She figures prominently in the myths of both Heracles and Theseus. The myths about her are therefore varied enough that they may be about several different women.

In the myth of Heracles, Hippolyta’s girdle (ζωστὴρ Ἱππολύτης) was the object of his ninth labor. He was sent to retrieve it for Admete, the daughter of King Eurystheus. Most versions of the myth indicate that Hippolyta was so impressed with Heracles that she gave him the girdle without argument, perhaps while visiting him on his ship. Then (according to Pseudo-Apollodorus), the goddess Hera, making herself appear as one of the Amazons, spread a rumor among them that Heracles and his crew were abducting their queen, so the Amazons attacked the ship. In the fray that followed, Heracles slew Hippolyta, stripped her of the belt, fought off the attackers, and sailed away.” taken from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippolyta

Who was Achilles?

” In Greek mythology, Achilles (/əˈkɪlz/uh-KILL-eez; Greek: Ἀχιλλεύς [a.kʰil.le͜ús]) was a Greek hero of the Trojan War and the central character and greatest warrior of Homer’s Iliad. His mother was the immortal nereid Thetis, and his father, the mortal Peleus, was the king of the Myrmidons.

Achilles’ most notable feat during the Trojan War was the slaying of the Trojan hero Hector outside the gates of Troy. Although the death of Achilles is not presented in the Iliad, other sources concur that he was killed near the end of the Trojan War by Paris, who shot him in the heel with an arrow. Later legends (beginning with a poem by Statius in the 1st century AD) state that Achilles was invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel because, when his mother Thetis dipped him in the river Styx as an infant, she held him by his heels. Alluding to these legends, the term “Achilles heel” has come to mean a point of weakness, especially in someone or something with an otherwise strong constitution.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achilles

 

Who was Heracles?

” Heracles (/ˈhɛrəklz/ HERR-ə-kleez; Ancient Greek: ἩρακλῆςHēraklēs, from Hēra, “Hera”), born Alcaeus (ἈλκαῖοςAlkaios) or Alcides (ἈλκείδηςAlkeidēs), was a divine hero in Greek mythology, the son of Zeus and Alcmene, foster son of Amphitryon and great-grandson and half-brother (as they are both sired by the god Zeus) of Perseus. He was the greatest of the Greek heroes, a paragon of masculinity, the ancestor of royal clans who claimed to be Heracleidae (Ἡρακλεῖδαι), and a champion of the Olympian order against chthonic monsters. In Rome and the modern West, he is known as Hercules, with whom the later Roman emperors, in particular, Commodus and Maximian, often identified themselves. The Romans adopted the Greek version of his life and work essentially unchanged, but added an anecdotal detail of their own, some of it linking the hero with the geography of the Central Mediterranean. Details of his cult were adapted to Rome as well.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heracles

Crazy Things Ancient Greeks Did!

Ancient Greece was a magnificent civilization developed many years ago, still today we are learning interesting facts about them. In this occasion, we have made a list of crazy things they did, read on and learn more about them. Ancient Greece and their culture are absolutely amazing!

Milo of Croton
The Ancient Greeks invented progressive strength training. Milo of Croton won six Olympiads in the wrestling events. He also won multiple times at the Pythian Games, Isthmian Games, and Nemean Games. Milo loved to show off his strength and dexterity. According to sources, his favorite trick was to hold a pomegranate and have people try to take it from him. No one was strong enough to take the pomegranate from him and he also managed to not damage the fruit. How did he gain such prodigious strength and skill?
According to popular legend, Milo noticed a newborn calf near his home. He decided to lift the animal and carry it on his shoulders. He returned the next day and did it again. He did it every day until the calf grew to a four-year-old bull. Thus was progressive strength training born?
Here’s another wild athlete story. Theagenes of Thasos was a formidable fighter who won over 1,300 bouts over his two-decade career. He even won a crown for long-distance running in the city of Argos. As a boxer, he was never defeated. According to legend, years after his, a vandal tried to deface a statue honoring Theagenes. The bronze statue broke in half and crushed the would-be criminal.

Birth Control by Sneezing
The Ancient Greeks had various forms of birth control. Some forms involved certain herbs and plants, which worked very well. However, one physician, Soranus, advised women to do something a little odd. After intercourse, women were told to squat and sneeze to avoid becoming pregnant. He also suggested jumping up and down to dislodge the sperm.
If that’s not crazy enough for you, the website Snopes.com was still debunking the “jump up and down” method of birth control as recently as 2007.

Brazen Bull
In the 6th century BC, a brass worker named Perilaus of Athens created a large, hollow ball made of brass and gave it to a ruler named Phalaris. A door on the side of the bull allowed a man to climb into the sculpture. Once the door was closed, a fire could be lit from underneath and slowly roast the person.
But it doesn’t end there. In the head of the bull was a series of stops and pipes that transformed the screams of the person into “the tenderest, most pathetic, most melodious of bellowings”. Phalaris was far from impressed. So disgusted by the cruelty of the piece, he asked Perilous to climb into the bull and demonstrate the capabilities of the pipes. Once inside, Phalaris shut the door and ordered a fire lit beneath the bull. He reportedly said, “Receive the due reward of your wondrous art; let the music-maker be the first to play.”
Before Perilaus, they removed him from the bull and threw him off a cliff. Despite Phalaris’s disgust, the brazen bull became the most common form of in Ancient Greece.
Here’s an extra fact. Phalaris was a tyrant ruling in Acragas in Sicily from 570 BC to 554. He’s known for several building projects but he did have a cruel streak that made him the proverbial “evil tyrant”. According to legend, after he was overthrown by a general, the new ruler ordered Phalaris to roast inside the brazen bull.

Victorious Corpse
Did you know? Cheating was a huge problem in Ancient Greek sport, just like today. Most of the time, it was the usual bribery or foul moves during games. Here is a picture of a scene on a kylix depicting two pancratiasts fighting. One of them is trying to gouge out the eye of his opponent while simultaneously biting. The empire is preparing to strike the fighter for the foul.
Some fighters would find an easier way and try to curse or hex their opponents using “curse tablets” to make them lose.
An event held during the Olympic Games was the pankration, which was a mixed martial arts style that blended boxing and wrestling. Most famous of the pancratiasts was Arrhachion. During the 54th Olympiad in 564 BC, Arrhachion entered the pankration to defend his championship. However, his opponent got the better of him and put Arrachion into a chokehold. It is said Arrhachion’s trainer shouted, “What a fine funeral if you do not submit at Olympia”. Arrhachion responded by twisting and kicking his opponent’s foot and dislocating it. The pain forced his opponent to surrender. Unfortunately, the move broke Arrhachion’s neck. Despite that, the judges named Arrhachion the victor. he successfully defended his title.
His fame spread as people held him up as the athletic ideal. Geographer Pausanias mentioned a statue immortalizing Arrhachion during his description of Phigalia