Could The Sugar Coating on Cells Mean the Penicillin of Cance?

Sugar is certainly important in humans, at a chemical level, at a biological level, at a psychological level and even at a social level. Now, this fascinating TED talk is giving us some hope on what could mean a new and very effective treatment for cancer. View the video and read on for some fascinating facts about sugar and humans.
Your cells are coated with sugars that store information and speak a secret language. What are they trying to tell us? Your blood type, for one — and, potentially, that you have cancer. Chemical biologist Carolyn Bertozzi researchers how sugars on cancerous cells interact with (and sometimes trick) your immune system. Learn more about how your body detects cancer and how the latest cancer-fighting medicines could help your immune system beat the disease.

“In most parts of the world, sugar is an important part of the human diet, making food more palatable and providing food energy. After cereals and vegetable oils,  the sugar derived from sugarcane and beet provided more kilocalories per capita per day on average than other food groups.[59] According to the FAO, an average of 24 kilograms (53 lb) of sugar, equivalent to over 260 food calories per day, was consumed annually per person of all ages in the world in 1999. Even with rising human populations, sugar consumption is expected to increase to 25.1 kilograms (55 lb) per person per year by 2015.[60]

Data collected in multiple U.S. surveys between 1999 and 2008 show that the intake of added sugars has declined by 24 percent with declines occurring in all age, ethnic and income groups.

The per capita consumption of refined sugar in the United States has varied between 27 and 46 kilograms (60 and 101 lb) in the last 40 years. In 2008, American per capita total consumption of sugar and sweeteners, exclusive of artificial sweeteners, equaled 61.9 kg (136 lb) per year. This consisted of 29.65 kg (65.4 lb) pounds of refined sugar and 31 kg (68.3 lb) pounds of corn-derived sweeteners per person.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar

 

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