What are Those Cities We Thought Lost?

Lost cities like Troy, one of the most famous cases. A legend of an ancient city of Troy is known and now the remains of the city were thought to be abandoned and forgotten. Here is a list of lost ancient cities that have kept their hidden secrets throughout history, but whose mysteries got unraveled when they got discovered by modern day archeologists. Check out these crazy ruins of Troy, Pompeii, Petra, Palenque and Angkor Wat!

Troy
The legend of the Trojan War is One of the most powerful stories from ancient Greek literature and forms the basis of Homer’s The Iliad. Most of us have also probably seen the movie. Ancient Troy commanded a strategic point at the southern entrance to the Dardanelles, a narrow strait linking the Black Sea with the Aegean Sea. The approximate Location of Troy was mentioned in several works by ancient Greek and Latin authors but was lost for hundreds of years until in the 1800’s when scholars Charles Maclaren and Frank Calvert were able to persuade German archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann to Excavate a mysterious mound know as Hisarlik. Everyone else had ignored Maclaren and Calvert claiming that the legend of Troy was just a story based on myth, not history. Of course, Schliemann took full credit for the discovery once he began uncovering the ancient city. Life lessons guys, always trust your instinct and don’t let other people take credit for your hard work. The actual site where the city of Troy was located has About 9 different layers of settlements, towns, and cities that could have been the Troy led by King Priam whose son Paris, ran away with Helen, wife of Menelaus, King of Sparta. The first and oldest layer dates back to the Early Bronze Age (around 2000 BCE). Later versions of Troy were destroyed by fire, and others by earthquake and war. Then, it was abandoned and forgotten, until the legend became truth.

Pompeii
When Pompeii was destroyed by Mount Vesuvius, the City was buried under layers of volcanic rock and ash—frozen in time—until its rediscovery and exploration in the 18th century. Pompeii had a population of between 10,000 to 20,000 people and was famous for its excellent farmland. One of the ironies of volcanoes is that They tend to lure people in because they produce very fertile soil. In the towns below it, most people would not have known that Vesuvius was a volcano or that a Bronze Age settlement in the area had already been annihilated almost 2,000 years before. Vesuvius is actually Inside the exploded skeleton of an older volcano. If you look at an aerial photograph, you can see the remaining ridge of a much larger volcano on the north side. Around 2,000 people were killed in Pompeii from a cloud of scorching gases and thousands of tons of rock and ash that rained down on the city. The powdery ash that buried everyone was so fine that You can even see people’s eyelids preserved like a plaster cast. Emperor Titus declared Pompeii an emergency zone and offered financial assistance for cleanup and recovery. But the buried towns were beyond salvaging. Eventually, Pompeii and Herculaneum were Taken off local maps and forgotten for hundreds of years. Within a few centuries, settlers had repopulated the empty terrain, unconcerned with what lay below. The African plate, on which most of the Mediterranean Sea rests, is actually diving beneath the European plate. Under pressure underground, the gases stay dissolved. When the magma rises to the surface it compresses, causing volcanoes to explode. To this day, Vesuvius Remains one of the world’s most dangerous volcanoes; some 3.5 million Italians live in its shadow, and about 2 million tourists visit the ruins each year. Although monitoring devices are in place if there is a major eruption with little warning and the winds are blowing toward Naples there could be another major disaster.

Harappa and Mohenjo Daro
The discovery of the Indus Valley civilization (aka the Harappan Civilization) in what is now Pakistan was first recorded in the 1800’s by the British. The locals also knew about it before then but there was no widespread archaeological excavation until the 1920s. This mysterious culture emerged nearly 4,500 years ago and thrived for a thousand years, profiting from the highly fertile lands of the Indus River floodplain and trade with the civilizations of nearby Mesopotamia. It remains mysterious because Scholars have still not been able to decipher the language, and instead have to guess at their daily lives based on the objects that have been found. Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa were highly advanced cities of their time, with Remarkably sophisticated civil engineering and urban planning reaching their golden age between 2,600 to 1900 BCE.
Harappa had a level of Architectural planning that was unparalleled in the ancient world.