What are The Most TERRIFYING Sea Monsters Ever?

Deep sea creatures roamed the ocean million years ago and many stories were built along there appearances and powers and strength. Today we have the pleasure of knowing about their interesting characteristics and their terrible aspect.

Predator X
Predator X is the most powerful marine reptile ever discovered. Over 15 meters long, and weighing about 4 tons, it was twice as big as most Jurassic predators.
The giant reptile roamed the seas about 150 million years ago and was officially classified as a new species. Now known as Pliosaurus funky, it had a massive 2m skull with a bite four times as powerful as a Tyrannosaurus rex. (Although I prefer the name, Predator X). Studies of the brain cavity of Predator X has revealed that its brain was actually similar to the much smaller great white shark?.
In 2006, scientists found two massive pliosaur skeletons in Norway. The giant creatures looked slightly different from other pliosaurs discovered in England and France over the last century and a half.
The pliosaur family had short necks and four large, paddle-shaped limbs like a turtle that allowed them to move up to 5m per second. The newly discovered funky species likely lived closer to 145 million years ago and ate plesiosaurs, related long-necked, small-headed reptiles.
The new analysis shows P. funkier had longer front paddles than other pliosaurs and different teeth.
This predator is still bigger than the largest living apex predator, the whale, which tops out at about 9m (30 ft) long.

Plesiosaurs
Plesiosaurs were a group of marine reptiles, or dinosaurs-that-weren’t-actually-dinosaurs but lived at the same time during the Jurassic Period. It had a tiny head and a long neck, paddle flippers, and a tail. Even though it was smaller than Predator X, Its mouth was full of needle-like teeth pointing inward, a perfect death trap for prey and for ripping flesh.
In 1987 a plesiosaur fossil was discovered with the bones of an embryo in its abdomen, proving that the animal gave birth to live young. This creature seems to have somehow given rise to the Loch Ness Monster as the physical description is very similar. Plesiosaurs would swallow stones weighing about 5 pounds (2.2kg) to help them digest their prey. If there was one plesiosaur you needed to watch out for, it was Liopleurodon (lye plur I dun). This carnivorous beast could weigh over 3,500 pounds and reach over 30 feet in length, including jaws that are believed to be 10 feet alone, complete, of course, with a very wide jaw and several rows of razor-sharp teeth. Their bodies consisted of a unique, paddle design for limbs, which has been tested and proven on small swimming robots that the Liopleurodon would not have been super fast they were terrifyingly agile. Most likely they hunted similar to the crocodiles of today, with short and fast burst attacks. So that makes them just perfect for any underwater haunted…aquarium.

Giant Sea Scorpion (Jaekelopterus rhenaniae)
Since there is no way I can pronounce this we’ll just call this one the Giant Sea Scorpion. Larger than a human and about the size of a crocodile (2.5m), the 390-million-year-old sea scorpion was the top predator of its day. This was one of the two largest arthropods to have ever lived, reaching a length of over 8 feet of armored, clawed horror. Most of us freak out at the thought of a tarantula, so it’s easy to imagine screaming like a banshee if you ever swam by one of these.
A huge fossilized spiky claw discovered in Germany in 2007 measured 18 inches (46 cm). We’ve known about super sized insects for years now but it wasn’t until this discovery that scientists realized just how big some of this creepy crawlies could get. The next biggest fossil arthropods were massive millipedes that grew more than 2 meters (6.5 feet) long.

Basilosaurus
The Basilosaurus’ name and appearance make it seem like an ancient reptile, but it’s actually a blood-thirsty ancestor of today’s whales. It’s ironic given that its name means “King Lizard,” but that is because when it was discovered by Richard Owen in 1834, it was thought to be a reptile. It wasn’t until over 10 years later that he discovered it was actually a mammal and tried to rename it the Zeuglodon, meaning Yoke Tooth, but that didn’t catch on. It is the closest a whale has ever come to being a snake due to its long eel-like body averaging about 65 feet long, complete with a narrow snout and jaw full of large spiky teeth. It most likely ate other kinds of prehistoric mammals as its main food source. Its skeletal structure was surprisingly weak for its size and power.