What are the MOST Dangerous Beaches In The World?

The most dangerous beaches around the world are located in different continents Africa, Australia and Asia. Many sharks and jellyfish swim in its beautiful waters or cases are that sewage waters are drained turning it more likely to catch some disease than a good time.

Check out the most dangerous beaches in the world!

Gansbaai, South Africa
Known as the Great White Shark diving capital of the world, the stretch of water between Gansbaai and Dyer Island in South Africa is also known as “shark alley”.
These sharks are drawn to the area because of the Colony of 60,000 Cape Fur seals living in and around that small channel of water. Instead of driving people away, the sharks are The main source of tourism in the area. Visitors from all over the world come to go cage diving in order to see these predators up close.
If you’re up for adventure travel then this would be the perfect vacation for you. Without the cage, it is One of the most dangerous areas to go for a swim in the world. Only because a person swimming might look a lot like a seal.
In 2013, a Couple on their honeymoon went on a cage dive and a great white approached, swam right past the bait, fit its head through the bars and thrashed around, trying to get at the couple. It almost killed the groom but, he survived. The near-tragedy Prompted critics to tell people to not cage dive, citing that chumming waters looking for sharks leads to fatalities.

Chowpatty Beach, India
Chowpatty Beach is both India’s most famous beach and One of the most polluted in the world. Even though the sea is unfit for swimming, every year hundreds of locals celebrate the Hindu festival of Ganesha Chaturthi on the beach. During the festival, it’s a Tradition to wash their idols of Lord Ganapati in the ocean water.
Because of the high amount of pollution, celebrants are more likely to Catch nasty diseases like e. Coli and hepatitis. The causes of the pollution can be traced to discharge from sewage pipes, waste from storm drains, and open defecation. For a long time, the beach itself was Covered in debris and scraps from salvaged ships. In August of 2016, the sands of the beach mysteriously turned black. An oil slick was blamed but the source of the oil was never found.

Fraser Island, Australia
Fraser Island, off the coast of Australia, is The world’s largest sand island. This paradise is extremely popular for camping and ecotourism but before you go, you should be aware of what lurks beneath the sand and sea.
Sharks and potentially jellyfish fill the waters around Fraser Island. Rip currents also pose a threat to swimmers and surfers. The beach isn’t much better, either. The island is home to some of the world’s most dangerous spiders, wild dingos, and large crocodiles. Spinal injuries are common from visitors careening around the sand dunes on four wheelers.
Every year there is a steady stream of accidents. The RACQ CareFlight is a charity-backed service that doesn’t charge its patients for rescue helicopter missions. From 2013-2014 the helicopters flew 64 rescue missions to Fraser Island.
During an average summer holiday, 40 to 50 emergency calls are made to paramedics. So far, at least one child has been taken by dingoes on Fraser Island and countless others have been Stung by the Irukandji jellyfish and airlifted out. Before visiting this natural wonderland, just be aware of what dangers you might face. And don’t feed the dingos!

Island of La Reunion, Indian Ocean
This little-known gem of the Indian Ocean, 140 miles from Mauritius, is One of the most intriguing spots on Earth. With an active volcano, forests, mountains, and scenic beaches what more could you ask of the tropical paradise? Just don’t go in the water.
For some reason, the waters off La Reunion are One of the most dangerous shark attack spots in the world. While in Mauritius, people are happily swimming, surfing, snorkeling, and scuba diving, at La Reunion, people barely dip more than a toe in the water because of a fear of shark attacks.
Since 2011 there have been 18 shark attacks resulting in 7 casualties. This means that in the past 5 years, 13% of all the world’s fatal shark attacks have occurred on this 40-mile long island.
In 2013 Officials placed a ban on swimming and surfing on more than half of the coastline. Before 2011, shark attacks were infrequent and rarely fatal. No one is sure why there are suddenly so many sharks in the area. One victim of the attacks was a 13-year-old up and coming surfer named Elio Canestri in April 2013. He went surfing after leaving a note for his mother and was caught while surfing in an unmonitored area.
Experts say that the Main culprits for the attacks are bull sharks, which are the most aggressive tropical sharks.