Actors That Died In 2016

A wonderful life is such an abstract idea, and yet, to appreciate the work some of these great dudes did, is great. These are celebreties, but I’d like to get footage and data about other very important people, that perhaps aren’t as medi friendly, that shold be. “But in Showbiz, In addition to the loss of renowned musicians such as David Bowie and Prince, many screen stars have also passed away this year, from cherished character actors to major movie stars. Here’s a look back at the actors and actresses we lost in 2016…” *Source bellow the video.

Alan Rickman

Born February 21, 1946, in West London, England, Alan Rickman showed an early penchant for the per | 4:42forming art| 5:03s. He cut his t | 5:21eeth as an actor | 5:42in 1978, when | 6:00he joined the Royal Shakespeare Company.Aug 31, 2016 –  Source .  Alan Sidney Patrick Rickman was an English actor and director known for playing a variety of roles on stage and on screen. Wikipedia  Born: February 21, 1946, Acton, London, United Kingdom, Died: January 14, 2016, London, United Kingdom, pouse: Rima Horton (m. 2012–2016), Parent(s): Bernard William Rickman; Margaret Doreen Rose, TV shows: The Barchester Chronicles, Therese Raquin, Victoria Wood’s All Day Breakfast, Awards: BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role, more

Gene Wilder

Gene Wilder was born Jerome Silberman in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Jeanne (Baer) and William J. Silberman, who manufactured miniature whiskey and beer bottles. His father was a Russian Jewish immigrant, while his Illinois-born mother was of Russian Jewish descent.

Anton Yelchin

Anton Viktorovich Yelchin (Russian: Анто́н Ви́кторович Ельчи́н; March 11, 1989 – June 19, 2016) was an American actor. He played Pavel Chekov in three Star Trek films, including the 2009 reboot film of the same name, along with the sequels, Star Trek Into Darkness and the posthumously released Star Trek Beyond (2016).

Born to a Russian Jewish family in Leningrad, Yelchin relocated to the United States, where he began performing in the late 1990s, appearing in several television and film roles, and received recognition in Hearts in Atlantis (2001). His role as Jacob Clarke in Steven Spielberg’s miniseries Taken was significant in furthering his career as a child actor.[1] He starred on the television series, including Huff and the posthumously released Trollhunters. He also starred in other films, including Alpha Dog (2007), Charlie Bartlett (2007), Terminator Salvation (2009), Fright Night (2011), The Smurfs (2011), Only Lovers Left Alive (2013), Green Room (2015) and Thoroughbred (2017).

In June 2016, Yelchin died in a car incident in Studio City, California.

Peter Vaughan

Peter Vaughan (born Peter Ewart Ohm; 4 April 1923 – 6 December 2016) was a British character actor, known for many supporting roles in British film and television productions.[1] He also worked extensively on the stage.

He was best known for his role as Grouty in the sitcom Porridge (despite appearing in only three episodes and the 1979 film) and also had a recurring role alongside Robert Lindsay in Citizen Smith, written by John Sullivan. He also had parts as Tom Franklin in Chancer (1990–91), playing the father of Anthony Hopkins’s character in The Remains of the Day, and as Maester Aemon in HBO’s Game of Thrones (2011–15).

Garry Shandling

Garry Emmanuel Shandling (November 29, 1949 – March 24, 2016) was an American stand-up comedian, actor, writer, and producer, best known for his work in It’s Garry Shandling’s Show and The Larry Sanders Show.

Shandling began his career writing for sitcoms, such as Sanford and Son and Welcome Back, Kotter. He made a successful stand-up performance on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and became a frequent guest-host on the show. Shandling was for a time considered the leading contender to replace Carson (other hopefuls were Joan Rivers, David Letterman, and David Brenner). In 1986, he created It’s Garry Shandling’s Show for Showtime. It was nominated for four Emmy Awards (including one for Shandling) and lasted until 1990. His second show titled The Larry Sanders Show, which began airing on HBO in 1992, was even more successful. Shandling was nominated for 18 Emmy Awards for the show and won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series in 1998, along with Peter Tolan, for writing the series finale. In film, he had a recurring role in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, appearing in Iron Man 2 and Captain America: The Winter Soldier. He also lent his voice to Verne in DreamWorks Animation’s Over the Hedge.

During his three-decade career, Shandling was nominated for nineteen Primetime Emmy Awards and two Golden Globe Awards, along with many other awards and nominations. He served as host of the Grammy Awards four times and as host of the Emmy Awards two times.



Alan Thicke

Alan Willis Thicke (born Alan Willis Jeffrey; March 1, 1947 – December 13, 2016) was a Canadian actor, songwriter, game and talk show host. He was best known for his role as Jason Seaver, the father on the ABC television series Growing Pains, which ran for seven seasons. He is the father of actor Brennan Thicke, and of singer Robin Thicke. In 2013, Thicke was inducted into Canada’s Walk of Fame. Thicke died on December 13, 2016 in the Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, California, U.S..


Patty Duke

Anna Marie “Patty” Duke (December 14, 1946 – March 29, 2016) was an American actress, appearing on stage, film, and television. She first became known as a teen star, winning an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress at age 16 for her role as Helen Keller in The Miracle Worker (1962), a role which she had originated on Broadway.[1] The following year she was given her own show, The Patty Duke Show, in which she portrayed “identical cousins”. She later progressed to more mature roles such as that of Neely O’Hara in the film Valley of the Dolls (1967).[1] Over the course of her career, she received ten Emmy Award nominations and three Emmy Awards, and two Golden Globe Awards.[2] Duke also served as president of the Screen Actors Guild from 1985 to 1988.[1]

Duke was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in 1982, after which she devoted much of her time to advocating for and educating the public on mental health issues.Duke died on the morning of March 29, 2016 in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho of sepsis from a ruptured intestine at the age of 69. Sean invited the public to contribute to a mental health foundation in his mother’s name, the Patty Duke Mental Health Initiative.

Garry Marshall

Garry Kent Marshall (November 13, 1934 – July 19, 2016)[3] was an American actor, director, producer, writer, and voice artist best known for creating Happy Days and its various spin-offs, developing Neil Simon’s 1965 play The Odd Couple for television, and directing Pretty Woman, Runaway Bride, Valentine’s Day, New Year’s Eve, Mother’s Day, The Princess Diaries, and The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement. He provided the voice of Buck Cluck in Chicken Little. On the morning of July 19, 2016, Marshall died at a hospital in Burbank, California at the age of 81 due to complications of pneumonia after suffering a stroke. News of his death spread worldwide and many celebrities paid tributes to Marshall.

Kenny Baker

Kenneth GeorgeKennyBaker (24 August 1934 – 13 August 2016) was an English actor and musician. He is best remembered for portraying the character R2-D2 in the Star Wars science fiction movie franchise.

In 1951 Baker was approached on the street by a woman who invited him to join a theatrical troupe of dwarves and midgets. This was his first taste of show business. Later, he joined a circus for a brief time, learned to ice skate and appeared in many ice shows. He formed a successful comedy act called the Minitones with entertainer Jack Purvis and played in nightclubs.

While working with Purvis and the Minitones, Baker was selected by George Lucas to operate the robot (“droid”) R2-D2 in the science fiction feature film Star Wars, released in 1977. Baker recalled that he initially turned down the role.

Baker appears as R2-D2 in six of the episodic theatrical Star Wars films, and played an additional role in 1983’s Return of the Jedi as Paploo, the Ewok who steals an Imperial speeder bike. He was originally going to play Wicket, but he fell ill and that role was handed over to Warwick Davis. He revealed a feud between him and his co-star Anthony Daniels, claiming Daniels had been rude to him on numerous occasions, and stated that Daniels is rude to everyone, including fans.

Baker continued his association with the R2-D2 character in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, which was released on 18 December 2015 in North America. He was going to be a member of the cast, but he served as consultant for the character instead. In November 2015 it was confirmed that Jimmy Vee was cast as R2-D2 in Star Wars: The Last Jedi, replacing Baker.

Baker’s other films include The Elephant Man, Time Bandits (also with Jack Purvis), Willow (also with Purvis and Warwick Davis), Flash Gordon, Amadeus and Jim Henson’s Labyrinth.

On television, he appeared in the British medical drama Casualty. He also had a part in the BBC production of The Chronicles of Narnia. In the late 1990s, Baker launched a brief stand-up comedy career. He played Casanova in the 1993 movie U.F.O.

In November 2009, his biography, From Tiny Acorns: The Kenny Baker Story, was written with Ken Mills and published by Writestuff Autographs.

Jon Polito


Jon Raymond Polito (December 29, 1950 – September 1, 2016) was an American character actor and voice artist.[1] In a film and television career spanning 35 years, he amassed over 220 credits.[2] Notable television roles included Detective Steve Crosetti in the first two seasons of Homicide: Life on the Street and on the first season of Crime Story. He also appeared in several films including The Rocketeer, The Crow and Gangster Squad, but was mostly known for his work with the Coen brothers. He appeared in five of their films, including Miller’s Crossing, Barton Fink and The Big Lebowski.


Alexis Arquette

Alexis Arquette (July 28, 1969 – September 11, 2016) was an American actress, cabaret performer, underground cartoonist, and activist. She was well known for her gender transitioning, and for supporting other people making similar transitions.


Robert Vaughn

Robert Francis Vaughn (November 22, 1932 – November 11, 2016) was an American actor noted for his stage, film and television work.[1] His best-known TV roles include suave spy Napoleon Solo in the 1960s series The Man from U.N.C.L.E.; wealthy detective Harry Rule in the 1970s series The Protectors; Morgan Wendell in the 1978-79 mini series “Centennial“; formidable General Hunt Stockwell in the 5th season of the 1980s series The A-Team; and grifter and card sharp Albert Stroller in the British television drama series Hustle (2004–2012), for all but one of its 48 episodes. He also appeared in the British soap opera Coronation Street as Milton Fanshaw, a love interest for Sylvia Goodwin between January and February 2012.[2]

Ron Glass

Ronald Earle “Ron” Glass (July 10, 1945 – November 25, 2016) was an American actor. He was known for his roles as literary Det. Ron Harris in the television sitcom Barney Miller (1975–1982), and as the spiritual Shepherd Derrial Book in the 2002 science fiction series Firefly and its sequel film Serenity.

Alice Elizabeth Drummond

Alice Elizabeth Drummond (née Ruyter, May 21, 1928 – November 30, 2016) was an American actress. A veteran Off-Broadway performer, in 1970, she was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Play for her performance as Mrs. Lee in The Chinese by Murray Schisgal. Despite her extensive acting career, she is most well known as the librarian in the opening scenes in the 1984 horror-comedy Ghostbusters.

Margaret Whitton

Whitton was born in Fort Meade, Maryland, a suburb of Baltimore. She first noticeably appeared on the stage in 1973, billed as Peggy Whitton. Her first work was on the New York stage, where she worked as a dog walker between parts.[3] In the early 1980s, she began to be billed by her birth name and made her Broadway debut in 1982’s Steaming.

Whitton did her primary film work between 1986 and 1993. Her most visible roles were that of Michael J. Fox‘s character’s under-appreciated aunt-by-marriage in The Secret of My Success (1987), and as the spiteful baseball team owner Rachel Phelps in Major League[4] (1989), and its sequel, Major League II (1994). Whitton also appeared in the Robin WilliamsKurt Russell vehicle The Best of Times (1986) and in Mel Gibson‘s The Man Without a Face (1993). Her other film roles included parts in National Lampoon Goes to the Movies (1982), Love Child (1982) and 9½ Weeks (1986) as Molly.[3]

Zsa Zsa Gabor

Zsa Zsa Gabor (/ˈʒɑːʒɑː ˈɡɑːbɔːr, ɡəˈbɔːr/ ZHAH-zhah GAH-bor, gə-BOR; Hungarian: [ˈʒɒʒɒ ˈɡaːbor]; born Sári Gábor [ˈʃaːri ˈɡaːbor]; February 6, 1917 – December 18, 2016) was a Hungarian-American actress and socialite. Her sisters were actresses Eva and Magda Gabor.

Gabor began her stage career in Vienna and was crowned Miss Hungary in 1936.[3] She emigrated from Hungary to the United States in 1941. Becoming a sought-after actress with “European flair and style”, she was considered to have a personality that “exuded charm and grace”.[4] Her first film role was a supporting role in Lovely to Look At. She later acted in We’re Not Married! and played one of her few leading roles in the John Huston-directed film, Moulin Rouge (1952). Huston would later describe her as a “creditable” actress.[5]